School of Computer Science

Natural Language Processing

Overview

The Natural Language Processing group performs basic and applied research on every level of language. One main strand of both our basic and our applied research is figurative language. Our applied research also includes senitment analysis, information retrieval, and probabilistic analysis of text, the last leading for instance to a tool for unsupervised topic-wise clustering of large document collections.

In our research is the understanding of figurative language (metaphor, etc.) in everyday contexts, the ATT-Meta project has, in its general theory and its implemented system, introduced unprecedented flexibility into metaphor processing through a revised view of the nature of metaphorical mappings, use of default reasoning, and thorough integration of mappings into reasoning.

The Gen-Meta project represents the extension of our work on figurative language to the question of the generation of metaphor. The project rests in part on the ATT-Meta system (above).

The e-drama project (2003-2007) prototyped algorithms for real-time affective-metaphor processing in automated conversational agents in virtual role-play (as part of a collaboration with BT and two local SMEs: Hi8us Midlands and Maverick TV).

If you wish to contact a particular member of the group, please use the links below to go to that person's page. If you do not know whom to contact, then by default you should contact

Dr Mark Lee
School of Computer Science
University of Birmingham
England
B15 2TT
M.G.Lee@cs.bham.ac.uk
http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/~mgl/
+44 (0)121 414 4765

Academic Staff

Research Fellows/Associates

Research Students + Visitors

Previous Members

  • Dr Rodrigo Agerri
  • Dr David Brooks
  • Dr Peter Coxhead
  • Dr Chris Creed
  • Dr Kirsty Crombie Smith
  • Dr Antoni Diller
  • Dr William Edmondson
  • Dr Helen Gaylard
  • Dr Sheila Glasbey
  • Dr Jon Iles
  • Dr Dorota Iskra
  • Dr Elliot Smith
  • Dr Alan Wallington
  • Dr Xin Wang
  • Dr Jeff Wen
  • Dr Dan Winchester
  • Dr Sylvia Wong
  • Dr Li Jane Zhang

Completed PhD Theses

Student
David Brooks
Title
Unsupervised Natural Language Syntax Induction from Corpora
Date
2007
Supervisor
Dr Mark Lee
Student
Xin Yang
Title
Observation Saliency Estimation Using Latent Variable Models in the Context of Data Clustering
Date
2007
Supervisor
Dr Ata Kaban
Student
Daniel Winchester
Title
Cross-document coreference and proper names
Date
2005
Supervisor
Dr Mark Lee
Student
Li Jane Zhang
Title
A syllable-based, pseudo-articulatory approach to speech recognition
Date
2004
Supervisor
Dr William Edmondson
Student
Dorota Iskra
Title
Feature-based approach to speech recognition
Date
2000
Supervisor
Dr William Edmondson
Student
Elliot Smith
Title
Incoherence and text comprehension: cognitive and computational models of inferential control
Date
2000
Supervisor
Dr Peter Hancox
Student
Sylvia Wong
Title
An investigation into the use of argument structure and lexical mapping theory for machine translation
Date
1999
Supervisor
Dr Peter Hancox
Student
Helen Gaylard
Title
Phrase structure in a computational model of child language acquisition
Date
1995
Supervisor
Dr Peter Hancox Lee
Student
Jon Iles
Title
Text-to-speech conversion using feature-based formant synthesis in a non-linear framework
Date
1995
Supervisor
Dr William Edmondson