THE UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM
School of Computer Science
THE COGNITION AND AFFECT PROJECT

PAPERS ADDED IN THE YEAR 2006 (APPROXIMATELY)

PAPERS 2006 CONTENTS LIST
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NOTE

See also

This file is http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/research/projects/cogaff/06.html
Maintained by Aaron Sloman -- who does not respond to Facebook requests.
It contains an index to files in the Cognition and Affect Project's FTP/Web directory produced or published in the year 2006. Some of the papers published in this period were produced earlier and are included in one of the lists for an earlier period http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/research/cogaff/0-INDEX.html#contents

A list of PhD and MPhil theses was added in June 2003

This file Last updated: 31 Mar 2007; 13 Nov 2010; 7 Jul 2012


PAPERS (AND TALKS) IN THE COGNITION AND AFFECT DIRECTORY
Produced or published in 2006 (Approximately)
(Latest first)

Most of the papers listed here are in postscript and PDF format. More recent papers are in PDF only. A few are in HTML only.
For information on free browsers for these formats see http://www.cs.bham.ac.uk/~axs/browsers.html


The following Contents list (in reverse chronological order) contains links to locations in this file giving further details, including abstracts, and links to the papers themselves.

JUMP TO DETAILED LIST (After Contents)

CONTENTS -- FILES 2006 (Latest First)

What follows is a list of links to more detailed information about each paper. From there you can select the actual papers, in various formats, e.g. PDF, postscript and some in html.

Title: CoSy Papers and Presentations
Authors: Various


Title: Aiming for More Realistic Vision Systems
Authors: Aaron Sloman and Members of the CoSy Project

Title: A cooperative study of approaches to multi agent planning. (PhD thesis) 2006
Authors: Dave Gurnell

Now in another file
Title: Rules of inference, or suppressed premisses? (1964)
Authors: Aaron Sloman

Title: Designing Agents to Understand Infants. PhD thesis, 2006
Authors: Dean Petters

Title: Image Interpretation, The Way Ahead?
(Proceedings of an international symposium organised by The Rank Prize Funds, London, Sept 1982.)
Author: Aaron Sloman (1983)
(Link to another file)

Title: Four Concepts of Freewill: Two of them incoherent
Author: Aaron Sloman

Title: Why Asimov's three laws of robotics are unethical
Author: Aaron Sloman

Title: Processing-based concept kinds for actor-agent communities
Authors: Manuela Viezzer, Niek Wijngaards and Masja Kempen


DETAILS OF FILES AVAILABLE

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CoSy Papers and Presentations
Many CogAff papers are now being added to the CoSy Web site


sloman-vision-requirements.pdf
TITLE: Aiming for More Realistic Vision Systems
AUTHOR(S): Aaron Sloman and Members of the CoSy Project
Technical report COSY-TR-0603 (PDF)
DATE INSTALLED: 22 Apr 2006
ABSTRACT:
An earlier position paper made a number of claims about requirements for vision systems that matched functionality of advanced biological vision systems, including human vision systems. It was suggested that most vision research ignored important requirements for vision to support action. Since then our understanding of those requirements has been enhanced by analysis done within an EC-funded robotics project. This paper extends points made in the earlier paper in the light of more recent investigations. Whereas previously it seemed that the function of vision was best thought of as providing information about spatial structures and affordances at different levels of abstraction, there are now reasons to regard it as primarily concerned with providing information about processes at different levels of abstraction, in partial registration with the optic array. This can require running multiple concurrent simulations. There are precursors to this idea, including Max Clowes' slogan: 'Vision is controlled hallucination'. In this context static scenes are merely a special case of processes, where nothing is happening, and the perception of affordances, construed as possibilities for and constraints on change, can be explained as using the ability to run simulations. In addition, reasons are given for regarding much of the information provided by vision as a-modal, and also as intimately bound up with causation, in a way that relates to the human ability to do mathematical reasoning visually. There are many hard problems regarding how to represent spatial information. This paper outlines some of the requirements rather than designs.


gurnell-phd-2006.pdf
Title: A cooperative study of approaches to multi agent planning. PhD thesis, 2006
Authors: Dave Gurnell

Now moved to Another file.

Title: Rules of inference, or suppressed premisses? (1964)
Author: Aaron Sloman


Filename: petters-pdf-2006.pdf
Title: Designing Agents to Understand Infants. PhD thesis, 2006

Author: Dean Petters
Date Installed: 27 October 2006

Abstract:

This thesis attempts to understand infant behaviour by designing autonomous software agents to reproduce those behaviours in simulation. The infant behaviours that have been investigated are related to the phenomenon of infant attachment. Empirical studies of infant behaviour are abstracted and the function of the behaviours are assessed from an evolutionary perspective. The behaviours are then reformed as scenarios against which simulations can be evaluated. These studies include naturalistic observation of infants at home and exploring a park, and undergoing the Strange Situation Experiment.

A number of information processing architectures have been constructed that reproduce the infant behaviours described in scenarios. These vary in complexity from a reactive architecture with no capacity to learn, to reactive architectures that can learn by reinforcement, and deliberative architectures that can reason by forming simple plans. Computational experiments undertaken with interacting infant and carer agents show the presence of interesting dynamic properties, such as positive feedback loops. These feedback loops may provide an explanation for the empirical finding that patterns of infant attachment response cluster into three categories. This thesis demonstrates how the methodology that it is uses in investigating attachment behaviour in infancy may be extended to many other infant and developmental behaviours.


(Moved to another file)
Title: Image Interpretation, The Way Ahead?
(Proceedings of an international symposium organised by The Rank Prize Funds, London, Sept 1982.)
Author: Aaron Sloman (1983)


Filename: misc/four-kinds-freewill.html
Title: Four Concepts of Freewill: Two of them incoherent

Author: Aaron Sloman
Date Installed: 10 Jun 2006

Abstract:

There are at least four different notions of free will that drive philosophical and scientific discussions of the concept. Two of them make sense and are completely consistent with determinism. Two of them are incoherent, but worries about them cause people to argue that freewill is inconsistent with determinism. The coherent notions are the ordinary language notion used in giving or rejecting excuses for and explanations of action, and the more refined version of that used in law courts. The incoherent notions of freewill are the theological notion and the romantic notion.


Filename: misc/asimov-three-laws.html
Title: Why Asimov's three laws of robotics are unethical

Author: Aaron Sloman
Date Installed: 9 Jun 2006

Abstract:

Every now and again I get asked for views on Asimov's laws of robotics. Here are some questions and my answers.


Filename: viezzer-ecai06.pdf
Title: Processing-based concept kinds for actor-agent communities

To Appear in Proceedings of Workshop on Context Representation and Reasoning (CRR 2006) at ECAI 2006
Authors: Manuela Viezzer, Niek Wijngaards and Masja Kempen
Date Installed: 8 Jun 2006

Abstract:

Several high level methodological debates among AI researchers, linguists, psychologists and philosophers, appear to be endless, e.g. about the need for and nature of representations, about the role of symbolic processes, about embodiment, about situatedness, about whether symbol-grounding is needed, and about whether a robot needs any knowledge at birth or can start simply with a powerful learning mechanism. Consideration of the variety of capabilities and development patterns on the precocial-altricial spectrum in biological organisms will help us to see these debates in a new light.


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NOTE


Older files in this directory (pre 2006) are accessible via the main index


RETURN TO MAIN COGAFF INDEX FILE

See also the School of Computer Science Web page.

This file is maintained by Aaron Sloman, and designed to be lynx-friendly, and viewable with any browser.
Email A.Sloman@cs.bham.ac.uk