Modularity in Evolution: Some Low-Level Questions

Created by W.Langdon from gp-bibliography.bib Revision:1.3872

@InCollection{Altenberg:2004:MESLLQ,
  title =        "Modularity in Evolution: Some Low-Level Questions",
  author =       "Lee Altenberg",
  booktitle =    "Modularity: Understanding the Development and
                 Evolution of Complex Natural Systems",
  editor =       "Diego Rasskin-Gutman and Werner Callebaut",
  publisher =    "MIT Press",
  address =      "Cambridge, MA, USA",
  year =         "2005",
  chapter =      "5",
  pages =        "99--128",
  month =        jun,
  keywords =     "genetic algorithms, genetic programming",
  ISBN =         "0-262-03326-7",
  URL =          "http://dynamics.org/Altenberg/FILES/LeeMESLLQ.pdf",
  abstract =     "Intuitive notions about the advantages of modularity
                 for evolvability run into the problem of how we parse
                 the organism into traits. In order to resolve the
                 question of multiplicity, there needs to be a way to
                 get the human observer out of the way, and define
                 modularity in terms of physical processes. I will offer
                 two candidate ideas towards this resolution:

                 the dimensionality of phenotypic variation, and

                 the causal screening off of phenotypic variables by
                 other phenotypic variables.

                 With this framework, the evolutionary advantages that
                 have been attributed to modularity do not derive from
                 modularity per se. Rather, they require that there be
                 an 'alignment' between the spaces of phenotypic
                 variation, and the selection gradients that are
                 available to the organism. Modularity may facilitate
                 such alignment, but it is not sufficient; the
                 appropriate phenotype-fitness map in conjunction with
                 the genotype-phenotype map is also necessary for
                 evolvability.

                 Conclusion

                 I have endeavoured in this essay to delve into some of
                 the low-level conceptual issues associated with the
                 idea of modularity in the genotype-phenotype map. My
                 main proposal is that the evolutionary advantages that
                 have been attributed to modularity do not derive from
                 modularity per se. Rather, they require that there be
                 an 'alignment' between the spaces of phenotypic
                 variation, and the selection gradients that are
                 available to the organism. Modularity in the
                 genotype-phenotype map may make such an alignment more
                 readily attained, but it is not sufficient; the
                 appropriate phenotype-fitness map in conjunction with
                 the genotype-phenotype map is also necessary for
                 evolvability.",
  notes =        "Quantitative mutational effects under the 'House of
                 Cards' vs. ``random-walk''
                 assumptions.

                 http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=10484&mode=toc",
  size =         "32 pages",
}

Genetic Programming entries for Lee Altenberg

Citations