Using a Contextual Focus Model for an Automatic Creativity Algorithm to Generate Art Work

Created by W.Langdon from gp-bibliography.bib Revision:1.3973

@Article{DiPaola:2014:PCS,
  author =       "Steve DiPaola",
  title =        "Using a Contextual Focus Model for an Automatic
                 Creativity Algorithm to Generate Art Work",
  journal =      "Procedia Computer Science",
  volume =       "41",
  pages =        "212--219",
  year =         "2014",
  note =         "5th Annual International Conference on Biologically
                 Inspired Cognitive Architectures, 2014 BICA",
  keywords =     "genetic algorithms, genetic programming, Evolutionary
                 Systems, Contextual Focus, Creativity, Computational
                 Modelling",
  ISSN =         "1877-0509",
  DOI =          "doi:10.1016/j.procs.2014.11.105",
  URL =          "http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877050914015506",
  abstract =     "We sought to implement and determine whether
                 incorporating cognitive based contextual focus into a
                 genetic programming fitness function would play a
                 crucial role in enabling the computer system to
                 generate art that humans find creative (i.e. possessing
                 qualities of novelty and aesthetic value typically
                 ascribed to the output of a creative artistic process).
                 We implemented contextual focus in the evolutionary art
                 algorithm by giving the program the capacity to vary
                 its level of fluidity and functional triggered dynamic
                 control over different phases of the creative process.
                 The domain of portrait painting was chosen because it
                 requires both focused attention (analytical thought) to
                 accomplish the primary goal of creating portrait sitter
                 resemblance as well as defocused attention (associative
                 thought) to creativity deviate from resemblance i.e.,
                 to meet the broad and often conflicting criteria of
                 aesthetic art. Since judging creative art is
                 subjective, rather than use quantitative analysis, a
                 representative subset of the automatically produced
                 art-work from this system was selected and submitted to
                 many peer reviewed and commissioned art shows, thereby
                 allowing it to be judged positively or negatively as
                 creative by human art curators, reviewers and the art
                 gallery going public.",
}

Genetic Programming entries for Steve DiPaola

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