Two Ways of Discovering the Size and Shape of a Computer Program to Solve a Problem

Created by W.Langdon from gp-bibliography.bib Revision:1.3973

@InProceedings{Koza:1995:2ss,
  author =       "John R. Koza",
  title =        "Two Ways of Discovering the Size and Shape of a
                 Computer Program to Solve a Problem",
  booktitle =    "Genetic Algorithms: Proceedings of the Sixth
                 International Conference (ICGA95)",
  year =         "1995",
  editor =       "Larry J. Eshelman",
  pages =        "287--294",
  address =      "Pittsburgh, PA, USA",
  publisher_address = "San Francisco, CA, USA",
  month =        "15-19 " # jul,
  publisher =    "Morgan Kaufmann",
  keywords =     "genetic algorithms, genetic programming",
  ISBN =         "1-55860-370-0",
  URL =          "http://www.genetic-programming.com/jkpdf/icga1995.pdf",
  abstract =     "The requirement that the user predetermine the size
                 and shape of the ultimate solution to a problem has
                 been a bane of automated machine learning from the
                 earliest times. This paper compares two techniques for
                 automatically discovering, during a run of genetic
                 programming, the architecture of a multi-part computer
                 program while concurrently solving the problem. In the
                 first technique, called evolutionary selection, the
                 initial random population is architecturally diverse
                 and there is a competition during the run among the
                 various architectures while they are trying to solve
                 the problem. The second technique, called evolution of
                 architecture, employs six new architecture-altering
                 operations that provide a way to evolve the
                 architecture of a multi-part program in the sense of
                 actually changing the architecture of the program
                 dynamically during the run. The new
                 architecture-altering operations are motivated by the
                 naturally occurring operation of gene duplication, as
                 described in Susumu Ohno's provocative book Evolution
                 by Means of Gene Duplication.",
}

Genetic Programming entries for John Koza

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