BEAGLE A Darwinian Approach to Pattern Recognition

Created by W.Langdon from gp-bibliography.bib Revision:1.2639

@Article{kybernetes:forsyth,
  author =       "Richard Forsyth",
  title =        "{BEAGLE} {A} {Darwinian} Approach to Pattern
                 Recognition",
  journal =      "Kybernetes",
  year =         "1981",
  volume =       "10",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "159--166",
  keywords =     "genetic algorithms, genetic programming, soccer foot
                 ball pools",
  URL =          "http://www.richardsandesforsyth.net/pubs/beagle81.pdf",
  URL =          "http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/W.Langdon/ftp/papers/kybernetes_forsyth.pdf",
  doi =          "doi:10.1108/eb005587",
  size =         "8 pages",
  ISSN =         "0368-492X",
  abstract =     "BEAGLE (Biological Evolutionary Algorithm Generating
                 Logical Expressions) is a computer package producing
                 decision-rules by induction from a database. It works
                 on the principle of naturalistic selection whereby
                 rules that fit the data badly are killed off and
                 replaced by mutations of better rules or by new rules
                 created by mating two better adapted rules. The rules
                 are Boolean expressions represented by tree
                 structures.

                 The software consists of two Pascal programs, HERB
                 (Heuristic Evolutionary Rule Breeder) and LEAF (Logical
                 Evaluator And Forecaster). HERB improves a given
                 starting set of rules by running over several simulated
                 generations, LEAF uses the rules to classify samples
                 from a database where the correct membership may not be
                 known. Preliminary test on three different databases
                 have been carried out -- on hospital admissions
                 (classing heart patients as deaths or survivors), on
                 athletic physique (classing Olympic finalists as
                 long-distance runners or sprinters) and on football
                 results (categorising games into draws and
                 non-draws)

                 It appears from the tests that the method works better
                 than the standard discriminant analysis technique based
                 on a linear discriminant function, and hence that this
                 long-neglected approach warrants further
                 investigation.",
  notes =        "Copy from British Library May 1994",
}

Genetic Programming entries for Richard Forsyth